4.6

Geometry and measurement. The student applies mathematical process standards to analyze geometric attributes in order to develop generalizations about their properties. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify points, lines, line segments, rays, angles, and perpendicular and parallel lines;

(B)  identify and draw one or more lines of symmetry, if they exist, for a two-dimensional figure;

(C)  apply knowledge of right angles to identify acute, right, and obtuse triangles; and

(D)  classify two-dimensional figures based on the presence or absence of parallel or perpendicular lines or the presence or absence of angles of a specified size.

4.7

Geometry and measurement. The student applies mathematical process standards to solve problems involving angles less than or equal to 180 degrees. The student is expected to:

(A)  illustrate the measure of an angle as the part of a circle whose center is at the vertex of the angle that is "cut out" by the rays of the angle. Angle measures are limited to whole numbers;

(B)  illustrate degrees as the units used to measure an angle, where 1/360 of any circle is one degree and an angle that "cuts" n/360 out of any circle whose center is at the angle's vertex has a measure of n degrees. Angle measures are limited to whole numbers;

(C)  determine the approximate measures of angles in degrees to the nearest whole number using a protractor;

(D)  draw an angle with a given measure; and

(E)  determine the measure of an unknown angle formed by two non-overlapping adjacent angles given one or both angle measures.

4.8

Geometry and measurement. The student applies mathematical process standards to select appropriate customary and metric units, strategies, and tools to solve problems involving measurement. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify relative sizes of measurement units within the customary and metric systems;

(B)  convert measurements within the same measurement system, customary or metric, from a smaller unit into a larger unit or a larger unit into a smaller unit when given other equivalent measures represented in a table; and

(C)  solve problems that deal with measurements of length, intervals of time, liquid volumes, mass, and money using addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division as appropriate.

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Tel: 817-681-8854

aarondaffern@gmail.com

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